FAIL (the browser should render some flash content, not this).

 

Corporate and Social Responsibility

 

We are committed to the continuing commitment by

ourselves and all our business partners to behave

ethically and contribute to economic development while

improving the quality of life of the workforce and their

families as well as of the local community and society at

large.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Partnership Through Engagement

 

Delivering a mechanism for the most cost effective, expedient and professional procurement of services to the construction industry.

 

Fayre Clough provide the

expertise where you

need it most...

 

 

 

 

 

The Palm Trilogy

 

The Palm Jumeirah, alongside the Palm Jebel Ali and Palm Deira projects,  was one of the most challenging ever undertaken.

 

Nothing on this scale of land reclamation had ever been attempted before and experts were brought in to look at every aspect, from offshore wave conditions to disposal of waste water.

A crescent was added to the design, a breakwater that would protect against the worst imaginable sea storms, yet still offer uninterrupted views of the sea.

 

 

 

 


 

Astonishing Engineering

 

The Palm Project was uniquely demanding. The crescent was built in multiple layers using sand, a water permeable sheet, small rocks and two further layers of armour rocks weighing up to six tonnes.

Underwater excavators, guided by divers, then laid the inside 'toe' of the crescent. An astonishing 92,234,000 cubic metres of sand was then transferred to build up the landmass.

Advanced Global Positioning technology ensured that the land was reclaimed to within one centimetre of the proposed design. Ikonos, the world's first privately owned satellite, orbits the earth 14 times a day, supplying high resolution photography of the project.

Connecting the crescent to the mainland required a subsea tunnel. During its construction an area of the sea was drained using a coffer dam and the seabed excavated to build the tunnel itself. The sea was then allowed back inside the dam area.